Roussospiti and Mt Vrissinas

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I have taken a day to wander just south of Rethymnon on a bike. In this area, there is a tiny pretty town, Roussospiti.  I was curious about the name of the town. I know ‘spiti’ means ‘house’, but I couldn’t understand what the name referred to.  My query at the taverna got a couple of locals quite animated. There are at least two competing stories: one is that the town was named after a red house, (in Italian, that’s ‘Rossa’), which was built by a Venetian merchant.  The other story says that the name of the town refers to a house built by a Russian woman (hence ‘Rousso’), who was very ill and came to Crete to recover from her ailments.  Apparently, her house still exists.

Beyond the lively taverna and the gossip, the reason for my wander to this part of Crete today is visiting a number of lovely  churches with Byzantine icons and frescoes I wanted to see, which are nearby, and going up Mt Vrissinas.  Wonderfully helpful staff at Karma Travel helpmed me find a place to rent a bike, and also advised on possible routes I could enjoy.  This proved to be a great tip.  Starting in Rethymnon and on the way to Roussospiti, I passed several lovely chapels worth stopping by to take a look at.  This route is best enjoyed on a bike, as the walk would’ve been too long, and going by car or public transport would have meant that I could not stop to see these lovely chapels on the way.

In Roussospiti, there is a 10th century church dedicated to the Mother of God, which hosts some ancient icons that are sadly not intact, as the eyes of saints depicted were scratched during the Turkish occupation.  Nearby, just by the entrance to a gorge, there is also a 14th century convent dedicated to Agia Eirini (Holy Peace).  The monastery is being reconstructed all thanks to the nuns’ keen efforts, with works ongoing since 1989.  The nuns sell beautiful home textiles (like tablecloths and tea towels) and hand-painted icons to sustain their titanic reconstruction work.   In the estate of their monastery, there is also a 15th century church dedicated to the Assumption of the Virgin, which is also looked after by these dedicated nuns.

At the top of Mt Vrissinas, there is a church dedicated to the Holy Ghost.  The view from up the mountain is amazing.  It took me some effort going up, even though it’s not particularly high. Anyhow, the bike stayed at the foot of the mountain, and I walked up.

I’m told that this was always considered a holy mountain. Before the existing chapel was built, there seems to have been a temple to goddess Artemis at the same site.  Even before this, excavations undertaken in the 1960s revealed a Minoan temple of significance.  The digs yielded hundreds of anthropomorphic and zoomorphic clay statuettes, as well as fragments of a stone vase with Linear A inscriptions, which can be seen in the Museum of Rethymnon.

If you would like to obtain advise to make the most of your time in Crete, contact Karma Travel! From accommodation and transfers to tips on enjoyable cycling routes, they are your reliable travel agent in Crete.

 

 

 

 

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Cretan Wines

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The history of Greek wine goes back a long way.  As described in previous blog posts, wine presses have been found which date back to the Minoan era.  Offerings to the gods often included wine, as evidenced by archaeological digs in temples. Findings of massive clay jars to transport wine  have been linked to the Roman period, when Cretan wine was exported across the Mediterranean.  During the Middle Ages, wine produced in Heraklion (vino di Candia) was highly valued in northern and western Europe.

In recent years, however, the exports are not quite so far-reaching.  Greek wine is beautiful, yet at least in the UK (where I live) it’s hard to find. I didn’t know much about it before I came to Crete, and it has become a treasured find!

In the 1970s, a plague of Phylloxera caused mayhem.  Whilst in France a similar coup caused the export of some key grape varieties to distant places, in Crete the plague resulted in serious losses of Kotsifali vines.   The plague is long over, and as proof of the old adage, if it didn’t kill local producers, it did make them stronger. Cretan wine production accounts for 20% of Greek wine.  It is produced mostly by cooperatives. This small-scale production doesn’t really have a powerful marketing machine behind it, which explains why it is not more famous.  This, however, may soon be turned around by a new generation of producers, oenologists, and marketers, all keen on making Cretan wine shine.

The two most important protected designations of origin for Cretan wines are Arhanes and Peza.  These protected  designations of origin are for Kotsifali and Mandilaria (which are used to produce red wines) and Vidiano and Daphni (for Peza white wines).  There are several privately-owned wineries, the most important of which are Lyrakis, Miliarakis, Boutaris, and Creta-Oympias.  Small cooperatives, unable to compete with larger companies, sometimes opt to be recognised for their inventiveness.  This is the case of small producers in Sitia, where a new variety of grape, Liatiko, is being explored for red wines, and a recent protected designation of origin status has been conferred to white wines made of Thrapsathiri and Vilana grapes.

If you’d like to learn more about the wine and admire beautiful Crete, I recommend this video.

If you are interested in coming to Crete and exploring the vineyards, discovering the ancient and new wine-making processes, and enjoying tastings of Cretan wines, contact knowledgeable Karma Travel.  They will be able to book wine country tours, visits to wine makers and tastings for you, and provide expert advise so you make the most of your visit to Crete.

Archanes

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It’s been a pleasure of a weekend back in Heraklion, and I have taken the opportunity to visit Archanes (also known as  Arhanes, as its Greek name is Arxanes).  What a gem of a little town!

Barely 14 km away from Heraklion, this could well be just a sleepy agricultural town, but the locals take pride in having meticulously restored it. Their efforts are much appreciated, as the maze of narrow lanes where balcony planters overspill with flowers is quite a joy to see.  You can easily spend an afternoon wandering coffee in hand around these narrow streets and tree-shaded squares.

I was told that the major of the city decided that ‘there is no past without future’, so this is where the restoration came about.  Whilst looking towards the future, this little town has a long-stretching past to show off, too.   Settlements from the Neolithic age have been found here by archaeologists, and there are four archaeological sites within a few kilometres. Fourni is a Minoan graveyard at the edge of the village, where a royal burial was found, complete with sarcophagi and rich offerings including necklaces made of gold, sardium and glass beads, fine bronze and ivory vases.

Vathypetro is outside Archanes, and was probably a palatial complex on a road from Knossos to the Messara plain.  The estate contained a manor house and several buildings, courtyards and workshops.  There are the remains of a Minoan wine press, an olive oil press, and a kiln, as well as vestiges of an ancient pottery shop.   Not a lot has changed in the region’s livelihoods for millenia, then!  Paradoxically, the excavation of this site has been hindered by the development of vineyards…

Archanes is one of Crete’s’ top winemaking regions.  Local producers take pride in their organic vineyards and traditional production methods.  The grape varieties grown here include mainly Kotsifali and Mandilaria, which produce wines described as ‘earthy yet fruity, with a deceivingly light colour’.  Two other adjectives I was given, which are not ones I’d often heard in relation to wine, were ‘honest and masculine’.  I guess that sums up the feel of this wine quite nicely.  I thoroughly enjoyed seeing how it was produced, and the tasting session was memorable.

If you would like to come and experience Cretan winemaking and wine tasting for yourself, please contact Karma Travel! Their expert staff will be able to organise vineyard and winery tours which you will surely enjoy!

Lake Kournas, Argyroupolis and Ancient Lappa

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With Lefka Ori (the white mountains) behind me, and surrounded by greenery, facing Lake Kournas, I’m spending an afternoon in an idyllic scenery.  This is Crete’s only natural freshwater lake, some 1.5 km wide and fed by underground springs.  Its crystal-clear waters change colour, I’m told, according to the season and time of day.  The lake is very much alive: turtles, crabs and fish can be watched from pedaloes or canoes, which one can leisurely paddle about the lake during the summer months.  Since I’ve missed that opportunity and we’re now in October, I’m quite content to spend my afternoon sitting on a lounger and soaking up the sun whilst reading a book.  There are tavernas around the lake, and so I can wander towards them to get myself a fresh portokalada (an orangeade) and sip it in pure bliss.  I’d been told to make sure I tried the myzithropitakia, cheese patties made with Cretan sour myzithra cheese, a staple of this region. So I obediently stopped by ‘Omorphi Limni’ (a taverna aptly named ‘Beautiful Lake’) and gave these heavenly treats a go.

I spent the morning visiting the pretty village of Argyroupolis, which was built upon a hill, and is built on several levels, with Kato (lower) and Pano (upper) sections.  With the advise of my trusted Karma Travel, I was able to hire a local guide to show me around, and knew to look for a particularly interesting herb shop in Argyroupolis, where I found a few cosmetic treasures.

This small town is steeped in history, which is evident from the rocks that make up its houses and public buildings.  As in other places, the building materials have been reused over time, and so these construction blocks were once part of Roman or Venetian structures.  The town’s current name dates back to the 19th century, when it was called Argyroupolis in reference to a silver mine in the neighbouring area.  However, settlements in this area are much, much older: this was once called Lappa, and there are references to its existence in Minoan times.  According to legend, the origin of Lappa can be traced to that era, when it is said to have been founded by Agamemnon, the hero of the Trojan War.

Lappa was a very important city whose territory extended from the north to the south coasts, and boasted two commercial harbours: present-day Dramia and Loutro.  The city was destroyed and rebuilt several times throughout its history. It enjoyed particular prosperity during Roman times (as evidenced by archaeological finds from the period), and also during the Byzantine period, when it was the Episcopal residence of Agios Titus, Crete’s first bishop and patron saint.  I particularly enjoyed a stroll around the Roman ruins of ancient Lappa, with its Necropolis, baths, and  aqueduct.

Down the hill, towards Asi Gonia, lies a particularly beautiful area with ten springs known as ‘The Holy Force’ (Agia Dynami).  Here, water gushes out of the mountains with such force that it was used to power water mills, which in the not too distant past dotted the area.  Nowadays, the mills are gone, but you can still sit to enjoy the view of the beautiful cascades from one of the many tavernas in this gorgeous setting.

If you would like to enjoy the peace and quiet of beautiful Lake Kournas, or are keen to visit the lovely Argyroupolis with its springs and ancient Roman ruins, contact Karma Travel.  They will be able to provide expert information and help you book all the services you need to make this a unique experience.

Dikteon Cave

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Can mere mortals debate the birthplace of a God?  Well, there is a debate about the birthplace of Zeus.  I have come to visit Dikteon Cave (otherwise known as Dictaean Cave) because other than the cave I visited in Psiloritis, this is said to be the ‘true’ birthplace of the God.  So I had to come and see what is so special about this, that makes it the most famous amongst the other 3,000 caves in Crete and 8,500 in Greece.

In ancient times, this was a place of worship and pilgrimage, as offerings found here attest.  Today, it’s still visited by travellers from all over the world, who, like me, are curious and awe-struck at the beauty of the cave.

The Dikteon Cave is  impressive,  rich in stalagmites and stalactites.  You walk down following a structure with protective railing, so the visit is hardly a spelunking adventure.  Nevertheless, the place is beautiful, and I must say that the lighting brings out the beauty of the rock formations even more.

At 1025m, the Dikteon Cave dominates the Lassithi Plateau and the whole of East Crete.  It is situated in the Dicte mountain range, and faces north.  The nearest village is Psychro, so proud locals also call it the Psychro Cave.  From this town, I have followed a paved path lined with oak trees. I was offered a donkey ride up to the cave, but declined.  At the end of the path, just before the cave entrance, I had to stop and catch my breath after a long uphill walk.  The panoramic view of the whole plateau was very worth a pause, and I suddenly realised how lucky I was to be standing on that spot and drawing in this blissfully refreshing mountain air, perfumed with thyme, sage and other aromatic herbs.

If a Goddess had to pick a fabulous secluded and secretive place to give birth to the one she knew would be the ‘Father of the Gods of Olympus’, this would be the place.  I’m sure this was no accidental choice!

The Dikteon Cave consists of five chambers large and small. The most impressive sight is the lake at the lowest point, surrounded by massive stalactites and stalagmites. At the lake, there is the ‘Mantle of Zeus’, a stalactite which hangs over the lake like a chandelier.  This shape, looked at with mythical imagination, resembles a cloak.  At the back of the lake, there’s a small chamber of the cave, in which it is said that the Father of the Gods was born.

If you would like to visit this ancient mythical place, please contact Karma Travel. They will be able to sort out all your travel needs, from transfers and accommodation to guided tours and advise on how to make the most of your time and experience authentic Crete at its best!

Yoga in Triopetra

Sunset in Triopetra, Crete, Greece creteisparadise.wordpress.com

How can you not be inspired to perform a series of sun salutations when you have a background like this?

I’ve come to Triopetra for a yoga retreat which I booked through Karma Travel.  A perfect way to truly ‘leave everything behind’ and find internal peace.  I know full well how ‘internal peace’ and ‘happiness  from within’ can seem elusive, especially when you are following a 24/7 routine and live an office life -even more so when the ‘rat race’ seems to be the only pursuit you’re leading.  I can’t complain about this being my case at the  moment, when I have a ‘mobile office’. Nonetheless, it’s always nice to make a pause and find time to have a meaningful encounter with yourself.   Fortunately, taking the time off for this yoga retreat has not hit my wallet as a major luxury, thanks to Karma Travel’s expertise and contacts.

The peacefulness of the amazing setting in Triopetra, the caring teacher who has challenged me and my fellow yoga practitioners to push ourselves both physically and mentally, and the amazing harmony they created amongst the group have made me love every second of the retreat.   Having practiced yoga for a few years under a number of teachers, I can say this has truly been a wonderful experience.  You need someone who can balance the mental, physical and spiritual challenges of yoga and push you that extra bit.  I feel thoroughly refreshed both inside and out.

The food offered throughout the week has been amazing, and I’ve also really enjoyed a variety of herbal teas (all collected from the fragrant Cretan mountains).  To enhance the feeling of being one with nature, we’ve been offered vegetarian or vegan food that is organic, grown locally, and prepared traditionally.   Flavourful, nutritious, yet detoxifying. What more can you ask for?

During ‘time off’, I’ve really enjoyed sitting on top of a rock to just watch an amazing sunset by the beach.  It’s incredible how such simple pleasures can really infuse you with such powerful inner strength and energy.

If you would like to come to Triopetra and experience this joy for yourself, get in touch with Karma Travel!

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