Lefka Ori

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I’ve spent quite a while wandering about, around, and between these mountains, so I thought they deserved a post of their own.  The beloved mountain range that sits majestically in western Crete, the Lefka Ori (white mountains), is also known as Madares (bald mountains).  The ‘bald’ side refers to a high desert —unique in the northern hemisphere— which lies at an altitude of 1,800 m.  It is located in the central and southern side of these mountains and can be entered via Anopolis.

The Lefka Ori are made of limestone.  This is why from a distance they look white or blueish -or pink if the sun hits them at a certain angle and you are quick with the camera!  More than this, the ‘white’ probably refers to what the locals think of as wintry white, perennial snow caps, which disappear in late spring.  

The highest peak is Pachnes (Cretan for ‘fog’), which is close to 2,500m above sea level.  There are also Mount Ida and Psiloritis, which I mentioned in previous blog posts.    There are also about 50 gorges cutting across the mountains.  The most famous is the Samaria Gorge.  There are also the Imbros and Agia Irini Gorges (mentioned before).

The gorges, the mountains themselves, and the plateaus between them are fabulous for hiking. In fact, the European E4 path crisscrosses these mountains. During spring and summer, there is stunning vegetation to be seen, not least a few species of flowers unique to this region.  In wintertime, though, it is advised that only experienced hikers and mountain climbers attempt to come here, as it can be dangerous.

Plan your springtime or summertime hikes and contact Karma Travel for advice regarding walking tours where you can take in the beauty of Lefka Ori and also learn about the flora and fauna of the region.  You will not be disappointed!

Psiloritis

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I’ve gone to explore a mythical mountain this time. Having spent all that time seeing Mount Psiloritis (also known as Mount Ida) as a backdrop to many places I have visited, I had to go and see the mighty giant for myself. This is Crete’s tallest mountain, at 2,454m above sea level. The climb is demanding and quite exhausting. It’s not something I could easily have done in one go. Luckily, there are hiking shelters and my place in one of these was reserved in advance by helpful Karma Travel. At the very top stands a small and rustic stone chapel dedicated to the Holy Cross (Timios Stavros) which holds the prayers of many pilgrims.

This mountain has its place in mythology as the birth place of Zeus. His mother, the Titaness Rhea, went to the Idaean Cave when her delivery time was approaching.  She squatted in the cave and pressed her fingers into the ground, so giving life to the Dactyls, small finger-like beings who were smiths and magicians, and would protect Zeus.  Her baby would stay in the cave to guard him from Chronos, his father, who had eaten all five  previous children she bore him for fear of a prophecy -he had been told by his parents that one of his children would dethrone him.

Hidden in the cave, Zeus was raised by a goat, Amalthea. A company of Kouretes helped conceal him, and they spent all their time making raucous noises in a continued effort to hide the baby’s crying, lest Chronos should hear him. When Zeus attained manhood, he confronted Chronos and forced him to disgorge all his siblings.  Zeus also freed the Giants, the Hekatonkheires and the Cyclops.  To show their appreciation, they gave him the gift of lightning, and helped fight and overthrow not only Chronos, but all Titans (his brothers and sisters) in a war called the Titanomachy.

Beyond its mythological connections, Psiloritis is considered a Geopark, part of the natural and cultural heritage of Crete, and is protected by UNESCO.  It is a geologist’s paradise, as it has unusual combinations of volcanic, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, some of which are a million years old.  The plant life is not only beautiful and fragrant, with wild thyme and sage patches like in the other gorges I have visited, but also includes orchids and tulips which are exclusive to this region.    Some parts of the park are also dotted with cylindrical stone structures built by shepherds, called ‘mitata’, which are used to make amazing local cheeses.

To discover the flavours of Crete and sort out your travel needs, contact Karma Travel!  Their friendly experts can advise you and will help you find small wonders you did not know existed in this Mediterranean island.

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