Ierapetra

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I am visiting the ‘Nymph of the Libyan Sea’, as Ierapetra is called by the locals.

This city, I’m told, enjoys fabulous, mostly dry and warm weather all year long.  Certainly, the weather didn’t disappoint when I visited.

Ierapetra is an ancient city, and has existed at least since the Minoan period.  At that point, it competed with Phaistos in terms of its importance.  In the 3rd century BC, its inhabitants sided with King Philip v of Macedon and Spartan Pirates to overtake an alliance including Rhodes, Byzantium, Pergamum, Athens and Knossos in the Cretan War, which in the end was won by Rhodes and Knossos.   Nevertheless, Ierapetra remained an independent city, until it was conquered by the Romans in 67 BC.  Some Roman ruins still remain, mainly in the harbor.

In 824 AD, Ierapetra was invaded and viciously destroyed by the Arabs.  Between the 13th and 17th centuries, the Venetians made it a prosperous city once more.  A few of the Venetian palaces from this era still remain.  As the rest of Crete, Ierapetra was also conquered by the Ottomans. A mosque remains in the old town, ‘Kato Mera’, as testimony of this period of the city’s history.  I’ve spent a good portion of the afternoon wandering about this part of town, with medieval streets, with narrow alleyways and cul-de-sacs which make for postcard-perfect pictures.   I quite liked a church dedicated to St George (Agios Giorgos), with its wooden ‘blind domes’.

If you want to visit Ierapetra and find out more about its history and flavours -I’m told that the raki here is the best in Crete- ask the experts!  Contact Karma Travel and they will be able to sort out your travel needs, from transport, accommodation and guided tours to visits to local raki distilleries and olive groves.

 

 

Agios Nikolaos

Agios Nikolaos, Crete, Greece creteisparadise.wordpress.com

After the peace and quiet of Psiloritis, I thought I needed a spot of people-watching in a bustling, vibrant place, so I came to Agios Nikolaos.

This town has a ‘bottomless’ lake (Voulismeni), which connects with the sea via a narrow inlet.  The lake is  lined with cafés, pizzerias, and tavernas with parasols all along.  On a balmy night, this was quite the place to be!

This was one of the first places in Crete to see touristic development, and it remains very popular with locals and foreign tourists alike.  It still features a commercial harbour, which exists since the times when the Venetians ruled Crete.  This was a particularly good spot for a major harbour, because it is sheltered by two small islands (where fortresses were built to guard the port), and it’s also sheltered from the sometimes vicious northwesterly winds that sweep other parts of the island.  The two small islands facing Agios Nikolaos are also home to an endangered species of wild goats, called ‘agrimia’.

On a morning stroll along the marina, I could see some dazzling yachts docking here.  I must confess I was a bit curious as to who were the owners of such lavish floating palaces.  Unable to find out any gossip worth mentioning, I was rather happy to find a small café selling wonderful crepes just by the slipway and indulge in a nutella-filled pocket of yumminess!

To plan your trip to Agios Nikolaos and obtain all-important information on the wide variety of options of accommodation on offer here, as well as activities including diving, yachting, golf, and visits to nearby monasteries and archaeological sites, contact Karma Travel!  They will be able to offer reliable help and advise.

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